The Complete Guide to Deducting Business Travel Expenses

March 29, 2016 : H&R Block

Tax deductions. In the vocabulary of taxes there are few words with a sweeter ring. This is particularly true for taxpayers who may not qualify for tax credits, namely the refundable kind. There are numerous tax deductions available: medical expense, charitable, student loan interest, mortgage interest and more.

One of the more complex and varied type is related to business travel deductions. Deducting business travel expenses is is particularly useful to taxpayers who own their own business, operate as a freelancer or contractor or have significant travel for their regular course of business.

Because of the complexity, we decided the topic deserves more than a few blog posts. The in-depth guide from The Tax Institute covers:

  • What is a “tax home”?
  • How to determine whether an expense is “ordinary and necessary”
  • Deducting international travel expenses
  • Differentiating personal and business travel expenses
  • Special rules for conventions and cruises
  • Local travel expenses
  • What qualifies as substantiation
  • Vehicle expenses
  • Industry-specific deductions
  • And much more

Click here to download “The Complete Guide to Deducting Business Travel Expenses” by The Tax Institute at H&R Block.

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