When Do I Need Form 8453 for E-Filing?

Using e-file can be a convenient way to submit your tax return. However, there are times that you’ll need to send the IRS paper documentation or certain forms to complete your return. 

Don’t worry — this requirement won’t keep you from using e-file. You’ll simply have an additional step in the process that involves using Form 8453: U.S. Individual Income Tax Transmittal for an IRS e-file Return. 

Once the IRS accepts your return, you’ll need to print Form 8453, sign it, and mail it into the IRS with the appropriate forms and documents attached. 

Forms and Supporting Documents Requiring a Federal Tax Signature Form

You’ll need to file this federal tax signature form if you’re attaching the following forms and documents:

  • Form 1098-C, Contributions of Motor Vehicles, Boats, and Airplanes
  • Form 2848, Power of Attorney and Declaration of Representative
  • Form 3115, Application for Change in Accounting Method
  • Form 3468, Investment Credit
  • Form 4136, Credit for Federal Tax Paid on Fuels
  • Form 5713, International Boycott Report
  • Form 8283, Noncash Charitable Contributions
  • Form 8332, Release/Revocation of Release of Claim to Exemption for Child by Custodial Parent
  • Form 8858, Information Return of U.S. Persons With Respect to Foreign Disregarded Entities
  • Form 8864, Biodiesel and Renewable Diesel Fuels Credit
  • Form 8885, Health Coverage Tax Credit
  • Form 8949, Sales and Other Dispositions of Capital Assets

When Do I Mail Form 8453? Will It Hold Up My Return?

Sign and mail your federal tax signature form and any supporting paperwork at the end of the e-filing process. Form 8453 won’t hold up the processing of your return, but you should mail it within 48 hours of when the IRS accepted your return.

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