IRS Name Change

 

If you legally change your name for marriage or any other reason, you must tell the Social Security Administration (SSA). It will update your Social Security record and send you a new Social Security card with your correct name. Do this before you file your return. If you keep your maiden name when you marry, you don’t need to notify the SSA.

The IRS will reject your return if the Social Security number (SSN) on your return doesn’t match the name it’s associated with on your return. This applies to anyone on your return, including:

  • Yourself
  • Your spouse
  • Your dependents(s)

Use Form SS-5: Application for a Social Security Card to change your name on your Social Security card. You can download the form at www.ssa.gov.

Take your completed application to your local Social Security office. You must also show a recently issued original document, like a marriage certificate, as proof of your legal name change. You must provide original documents since the SSA won’t accept photocopies.

If you change your name due to marriage, divorce, or annulment, you must also provide:

  • Identity document that shows your old name
  • Recent photograph or other identifying information

To get a list of acceptable documents and learn more, visit www.ssa.gov.

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