Question

Do I have to report Social Security disability income tax — SSDI Taxes?

Answer

Regarding Social Security disability tax, if you’re required to file a return, Social Security disability income (SSDI) is taxed the same as other Social Security benefits.

None of your SSDI is taxable if half of your SSDI plus all your other income is less than:

  • $25,000 if filing single, head of household, or married filing separately — And you and your spouse lived apart all year
  • $32,000 if married filing jointly
  • **fdSocSecTaxableInc3** if married filing separately — And you and your spouse lived together at all during the year

However, if half of your SSDI plus all your other income is more than the amounts above, part of your benefits is taxable. The amount of SSDI Taxes you will owe will depend on the total amount of your benefits and other income. Usually, the higher that total amount, the greater the taxable part of your benefits.

If a portion of your benefits is taxable, usually up to half of your benefits will be taxable. However, up to 85% of your benefits can be taxable if either of these situations applies:

  • The total of half of your benefits and all your other income is more than $34,000 — or $44,000 if married filing jointly.
  • You’re married filing separately and lived with your spouse at any time during the tax year.

Use Worksheet 1 in Publication 915 to figure the taxable portion of your SSDI benefits.

Related Topics

Related Resources

What Are Nominee Dividends?

Learn more about nominee dividends and your options for reporting nominee income with the tax experts at H&R Block.

What Is Adjusted Gross Income?

Adjusted Gross Income is simply your total gross income minus specific deductions. Additionally, your Adjusted Gross Income is the starting point for calculating your taxes and determining your eligibility for certain tax credits and deductions that you can use to help you lower your overall tax bill.

Celebrating Super Bowl 50 and Breaking Down the “Jock Tax”

California levies a jock tax on professional athlete income. And it's not the only state. Learn more about taxes on athletes with the experts at H&R Block.

Nonqualified Stock Options

Learn more about reporting non-qualified stock options and get tax answers at H&R Block.