He’s Not Heavy, He’s My Brother

April 12, 2016

Taxpayer learns brother can be claimed as dependent thanks to H&R Block Second Look®

Summary
  • Author’s note: This feature is one of a series of success stories generally describing tax situations routinely reviewed when H&R Block takes a look at prior-year tax returns new clients either prepared themselves or had someone else file.

Adorned on the iconic statue standing sentry at Boy’s Town, a home for boys and girls who need a hand up located in Omaha, Neb., is the now famous phrase – “He ain’t heavy, he’s my brother.” Sharing that spirit with his own brother is a taxpayer, who found that his love and care have some tax benefits as well thanks to an H&R Block tax professional.

Thanks to H&R Block’s Second Look* review of a prior year return, the client learned that because his brother, who is totally and permanently disabled, did not support himself and lives with him, he qualified to claim his brother as a dependent. By being able to claim his brother as a dependent, this meant an extra $3,900 dependent exemption. In addition, he was able to qualify for the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). After amending that return, this client was expecting an additional refund.

There are five tests a person must pass to qualify as a taxpayer’s dependent. For example, has the person provided more than half of their own support? The person must meet different eligibility requirements to qualify for the EITC.

Taxpayers who prepared their returns themselves or had others prepare them can visit any of H&R Block’s approximately 10,000 U.S. offices for a free review of the three prior year returns. Those who already filed a 2015 return with someone else can also bring in their 2015 return for the free review. Taxpayers can see if a Second Look is right for them with a free online assessment and schedule an appointment online or by calling 1-800-HRBLOCK.

* Results vary. All tax situations are different.
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