Question

I am an independent contractor without my own business and I have a question about filing my independent contractor taxes. When filing taxes as an independent contractor, where do I enter my expenses? And can you clarify the difference between being an independent contractor and being self-employed?

Answer

An independent contractor is generally considered self-employed and is typically defined as a business owner or contractor who provides services to other businesses. According to the IRS, the general rule is that an individual is an independent contractor (self-employed) if the payer has the right to control or direct only the result of the work and not what will be done and how it will be done.

Additionally, the IRS views an independent contractor as a self-employed person. Therefore, earnings of a person who is working as an independent contractor are subject to Self-Employment Tax.

If you are filing taxes as an independent contractor you are treated like you have your own business – even if you did not formally start your own business. As a sole proprietor of that business, you should file your independent contractor taxes on a Schedule C to properly claim your income and related expenses.

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